Europe

Stroll through the Charlottenburg Palace in Berlin

One of the main European tourist destinations is, without a doubt, Berlin. The German capital is one of the points on the planet where more cultural activities can be carried out. And there, If there is something you cannot miss, it is the visit to the Charlottenburg Palace. Do you want to know what you will find in it?

Built at the end of the 17th century, Charlottenburg Palace has immense gardens. Walking through them can be the perfect plan on a sunny day. The entrance to the surroundings of the building and to the garden areas is free, so there is no reason not to enjoy a corner as beautiful as this one.

An ideal rest area

Charlottenburg Palace Gardens

The gardens were built next to the palace in the year 1697. They had a marked French Baroque style, although almost a century later, in 1788, they were reformed. In World War II, the city was razed to the ground. This place also suffered significant damage, although it was not rebuilt again until 2001.

If you want to take a break after visiting the great historical heritage of Berlin, the most suitable place is this. A corner in which the sign of identity is its tranquillity. And one of its most impressive places is the lake.

Also in the gardens you will see the Belvedere. It is a beautiful late baroque and classicist building that has been used as a teahouse and now houses a large collection of porcelain objects.

Visit Charlottenburg Palace

Dance room

The gardens are the perfect place to take a little break. However, once you have regained your strength, you must visit the interior of Charlottenburg Palace.

this palace it was built as a summer residence for Sofía Carlota, wife of Frederick I of Prussia. A building that was baptized as Lietzenburg Palace. However, its name was changed after the death of the queen, who never saw it finished. In her honor it was named Charlottenburg.

Although the British bombing raids of 1943 caused significant damage, visitors can still admire the beauty of some rooms that preserve the original decoration. One of those spaces is the chapel, which shows beautiful frescoes on its ceilings.

 

In the Charlottenburg Palace you can see Frederick II’s room or the rococo-style ballroom. A good way to get an idea of ​​the lifestyle of the German aristocracy in the 18th century.

In the halls of the palace, moreover, it is possible to contemplate some of the possessions of Federico I and Sofía Carlota. The imperial insignia, a collection of tobacco pouches and hundreds of porcelain pieces stand out. Special mention deserves the most important collection of French painting of the eighteenth century outside this country.

The New Pavilion and the mausoleum

Charlottenburg Palace

Outside the palace, in the gardens, there are other areas that must be visited, such as the New Pavilion. In it you can see the authentic decoration of a Prussian house of the time. The exhibition of this building has several paintings by famous Prussian artists and some sculptures.

Queen Louise’s mausoleum is another point of interest on our visit to Charlottenburg Palace. The temple has a monument in memory of the queen and a skylight that illuminates the building.

Other museums in the same area

Bröhan Museum – Andreas Praefcke / Wikimedia Commons

Taking advantage of the visit to the palace and its gardens, a good idea is to visit one of the museums that are a few meters away. One of them is the Berggruen, which has an appreciable collection of modern art. In it you can see works by great artists such as Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti or Georges Braque.

Also near the palace, the brohan museum exhibits works related to the decorative arts of the modern era, especially in style art nouveau. In addition, there are representative works of the art deco and functionalism.

Along with these two museums, it is worth mentioning the Scharf-Gerstenberg, whose collection includes works from French Romanticism to Surrealism. These are three museum spaces whose visit is a perfect complement to that of the Charlottenburg Palace.

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