Europe

The different London, enjoy the city in another way

London is one of those cities that invite you to visit them again and again. This is mainly due to the low prices of flights, but also because it never stops giving you new things. Thus, we review some things to do in a different London and, especially, without leaving your pocket in the attempt because everything is free!

Different London: Little Venice and Camden

Little Venice

Okay, there’s nothing unusual about Camden. But we propose another way to get there that is not the subway, which seems to leave you in the middle of that neighborhood maelstrom. You can walk the promenade that goes from Little Venice to the neighborhood, passing through Regent’s Street. It is the calm before the “storm” that is Camden.

Y Little Venice is also one of the most charming places in the city. Dozens of small boat houses sleep on the banks of the canal and it seems that you have moved to a nearby town because the noise of the city does not reach there.

 

You can also do the journey by boat, although it will no longer be free. But it is also worth it, we assure you.

Parliament

Houses of Parliament

It’s great to see the Houses of Parliament from the outside, but what about seeing them from the inside? And what is better, why not attend a parliamentary session? It is not necessary to have a ticket to enter the ordinary sessions, although yes when the prime minister is going to intervene.

You can attend any of the sessions that are held from Monday to Thursday at the established times, which depend on the house you go to. You can find out more by visiting the official page.

Chinatown

Chinatown

This neighborhood delights all lovers of Asian cuisine. If you have never been to an oriental country, this is the most authentic thing you will ever see.

There are dozens of establishments, from restaurants to supermarkets, pastry shops or hairdressers, run by Chinese, so the food and products they sell there are 100% original. AND, if you go on chinese new year be prepared for the show.

Speaker’s Corner

Speaker’s Corner

It is, as its name suggests, the speaker’s corner. It is a part of the famous Hyde Park where dozens of people gather every Sunday morning to debate or, rather, argue. It’s on the paved area closest to Marble Arch, so you can’t miss it.

Supposes the exaltation of freedom of expression in a place that, curiously, served as the location for some executions that took place in London. Without a doubt, one of those different corners of London that you should not miss.

The Hardy Tree

Hardy Tree

This may be the most curious proposal that you will read here, but you should not miss it. We invite you to know a sample of the bad work.

We explain better: Thomas Hardy, before being a novelist, he was an architect. In 1860 he was asked to coordinate the removal of some bodies and tombstones from the city cemetery, as a train was going through St. Pancras Old Church. And Hardy couldn’t think of a better idea than to stack them around, at the time, a small tree.

Liberty’s

Liberty’s – Martin Pettitt

In 1875, Liberty’s opened its doors to the London public. Since then, it is one of the most famous shopping malls in the city and currently the oldest. Going up its wooden stairs and observing the care with which each product is placed makes you believe that you are going to travel to the 19th century at any moment.

Everything around you is of great value, from fashion to jewelry, even the building itself. From the outside it may look like an old palace or even a museum. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Royal Albert Hall

Royal Albert Hall

The Royal Albert Hall is the epicenter of culture in London. This place has served as the setting for the most disparate performances and performances, from sumo matches to tennis matches. Very important figures of music have also had the opportunity to shine here, such as Sinatra or The Beatles.

It was built at the request of King Albert. After her death, Queen Victoria did everything possible to fulfill her husband’s dream: to turn South Kensington into the largest cultural center in all of Europe. We suggest you take a guided tourlasting approximately one hour, to know all the details.

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